Russian Bibles Are Totally Different from American Ones. Here’s Why . . .

Page after page, and book after book, differences keep popping up. If you were to take the average English Bible and translate it into Russian, you would get something that is quite different from many of the Bibles that are actually in Russia.

Many people are surprised to find out that there are significant differences between Bibles in Russia, and most Bibles in America. Most English Bibles contain 66 books, while Russian Bibles traditionally contain more than 70. And within individual books, there are important differences as well.

For example:

  • Russian Bibles contain an important prophecy of Christ that is fulfilled in the Gospel of Matthew. American Bibles are missing it.
  • Russian Bibles contain the story about a family who is referenced in the book of Hebrews. American Bibles don’t have it.
  • Russian Bibles tell us exactly who Job is, and how he is related to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. American Bibles keep it a mystery.
  • Russian Bibles tell us how Queen Esther’s uncle Mordecai prayed, and how God was at the center of the entire story. In most American Bibles, the book of Esther never mentions God at all.

There are many other examples, but these will do for now. Page after page, and book after book, differences keep popping up. If you were to take the average English Bible and translate it into Russian, you would get something that is quite different from many of the Bibles that are actually in Russia. And at this point, most devout Christians are probably scratching their heads, asking the following question:

How can this be?

There are multiple answers to this question. There are many historical and linguistic details involved, so it is not possible to explain everything in a single article. But we can at least begin to answer the question. Today, we will focus on a single point:

Continue reading this article at its original location on the Russian Faith website . . .

 

Advertisements

About Fr Joseph Gleason

I serve as a priest at Christ the King Orthodox Mission in Omaha, Illinois, and am blessed with eight children and one lovely wife. I contribute to On Behalf of All, a simple blog about Orthodox Christianity. I also blog here at The Orthodox Life.
This entry was posted in Masoretic Text, Septuagint, The Canon of Scripture. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s